Video

On Angelina Jolie’s Double Mastectomy

Okay, fine, I have to say something. First, I applaud Jolie for writing a very good piece in the NY Times calmly and rationally describing her decision. I think this is really going to boost awareness about hereditary breast cancer, and that is a good thing!

On the other hand, I have already seen and am afraid of more people being quick to judge and make conclusions without the correct information. My best piece of advice for everyone is to EDUCATE YOURSELVES and make sure you aren’t blindly following the news or listening to moronic website comments. BRCA gene mutations are serious business, as are preventive surgeries. There is so much information out there that is easy to find (visit facingourrisk.org, for instance), so there is no excuse for ignorance, vitriol, or fear-mongering.

This video is my oncologist, Dr. Kaltman, from GWU Medical Faculty Associates talking about Jolie’s decision and BRCA mutations. I am posting it not to advertise GWU (though I do love my onco), but to provide some straightforward information.

Before I step off my soap box, I also want to admit that I’m angry. I’m angry because I know Jolie had the best doctors money can buy and I’m sure her reconstruction will be flawless so she can look perfect on the red carpet. I was not so lucky and I know many other women out there who were in the same boat. A mastectomy is not all roses and rainbows, it hurts physically and emotionally and, for many women, things don’t go as smoothly as Jolie’s writing suggests. Most women do not recover in a couple of days and they are often very uncomfortable with the way their body appears post-surgery. But while I’m angry, I am trying very hard to also be accepting and kind, as I always do when I hear about previvors who have “perfect” results and go through life never having to know the turmoil of a cancer diagnosis. I guess what I’m saying is we should all love our fellow man, especially around the tender issue of cancer. We are all different and when someone else has different feelings or experiences, it is not good to respond by badmouthing them in public. (Of course, feel free to gripe all you want in private. I, for one, am going to go scream into a pillow.)

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One response to “On Angelina Jolie’s Double Mastectomy

  1. I felt the same way – that she had the best experience possible, which most women don’t. I certainly didn’t, and while I also had it better than a lot of people, it’s always a little difficult to hear others talk about how great their experience was. A mastectomy is never going to be the perfect solution and for most women, reconstruction is never the same as the body with which they were born.

    I hope that now that one of the biggest celebrities in the world is cutting off body parts, someone, somewhere, will seriously start figuring out a better way.

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